Flame Tree Initiative

Social Entrepreneurship for African Development

The Flame Tree Initiative partners with African universities to foster scalable, socially minded businesses that accelerate regional change. We believe that training, mentoring and launching development enterprises - businesses that confront global development challenges – is a potent way to contribute to the new, innovative era in Africa.

 

Why Development Entrepreneurship?

Flame Tree is looking to put a new spin on development. Organizations, large and small, all over the world are spending billions on short-term projects based on creating solutions to the world's development challenges. The problem is, when the money runs out, the progress stops.

Why not make development financially sustainable?

Here at the Flame Tree Initiative, we want to watch the world change. We want to see projects shift from expensive, foreign-run programs to local level people creating their own solutions to problems like water and sanitation, energy poverty, and low-yield agriculture. And we want to see them grow in the private sector, where they can become financially sustainable.

What does Development Entrepreneurship do?

  1. Development Entrepreneurships produce and distribute development innovations -- things like solar lighting, improved agricultural inputs, and better health technologies. These, in turn, will create advancements in the surrounding population, leading to decreased poverty and social exclusion.
     
  2. Development Entrepreneurships also provide increased job opportunities in the private sector. This leads to an increase in household income, which enables families to better provide for themselves. They will have increased access to health care, education, and food. Women are also supported in their own DE concepts, bringing more women into the workforce.
     
  3. Increased job opportunities means increased tax revenue in areas where DEs are launched. This means there are greater opportunities for locally governed infrastructure and social services projects.

Rather than relying on outside donor funding, nations can begin to produce their own positive changes, funded by internal business models that are simultaneously solving urgent development challenges.